About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNNW 3
CSPAN 1
CSPAN2 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
crowds are gathered in cairo's tahrir square. they're protesting against president mohamed morsi and egypt's new constitution. thousands of protesters are supporting the president. they had have constitution one day after it was quickly approved. reza siayah has the news. >> reporter: we have seen hundreds of thousands of egyptians protest against president morsi and the muslim brotherhood. now it's the president's supporters and the broorthhood saying it's our turn. >> we support president morsi and his decision. >> we all support president morsi because this decision, we all need it. >> reporter: it's hard to say how many people are here. some say over 100,000. all say they support the president and just like the opposition faction, they can put on a mass demonstration, too. >> this is the real citizens of egypt. >> what about tahrir square? what do you call tahrir square? the protesters here? >> they're protesters and this is democracy. there are people who agree and disagree. >> reporter: there are a few thousand women here but it's overwhelmingly men. they are energized chan
president mohammed morsi. >> and hurricane sandy left many people homeless. new reaction from victims furious at relief response and president obama. >> president obama, he said he was going to cut through the red tape. he lied. he says, what do you mean? i said you lied. (car horn) paying with your smartphone instead of cash... (phone rings) that's a step forward. with chase quickpay, you can send money directly to anyone's checking account. i guess he's a kicker... again, again! oh, no you don't! take a step forward and chase what matters. >>. >> heather: two people have died after a bus crash in florida. the doubling decker was carrying 32 members of a church group when it slammed in an overpass. >> people in wyoming say the man involved in a deadly attacks yesterday used a bow and arrow in one of killings. authorities say this christopher krum first stabbed a woman on friday and then went to the college where his father was teaching and shot him with a bow and arrow. he later stabbed and killed himself. >> more than hundred people are waiting to return to home after a train derail
is not resolved. it is urging dialogue to avoid, quote, a dark tunnel. mohammed morsi has called for a day of dialogue but opposition groups rejected talks today. they walked out of meetings. the ones that bothered to show up. many didn't appear for the discussions. the egyptian opposition is demanding that a draft resolution on the constitution that is supposed to be voted on december 15th, they are demanding that vote be postponed indefinitely. they say the drafted constitution is too islamic and anti-democratic. late last night a member of the muslim brotherhood hinted as a compromise but as of right now, the rare hinted of compromise hasn't produced anything of substance. two sides still disagree over the vote and about the future of the constitution and the government. >> gregg: conner, thanks. >> with all of this going on. america is certainly sending egypt plenty of money. they get the most foreign aid of any country except for israel. an assistant for egypt has averaged $2 billion a year and military aide has held steady at about $1.3 billion since 1987. >> gregg: turning to syria
where there are new developments in the power struggle that started with p mohamed morsi's grab for new powers. we're there with details. ayman, we got word there were some considerations there to issue a new koconstitutional declaration of some sort. what can you tell us about all this? >> reporter: sure. it's important to set what triggered these protests two weeks ago, a constitutional declaration by president morsi that was seen as a power grab, gave him sweeping powers through the transitional period. it triggered protests. one of the central demands of the protesters and the opposition to the president has been that he rescind that dec e decree. for the past several days the p president has been trying to figure out a way to kind of minimize the scope of that decree. i has not worked. it has not pleased the opposition. today he met with some of the opposition forces, and what we're learning from egyptian state television, an official government news source, is that the prime minister has suggested that the president is considering a new constitutional declaration and perhaps in l
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
night in cairo. supporters, won'ts of mohammed morsi are taking to the streets. critics of the president and the planned referendum on saturday of a new draft constitution gather outside the presidential palace. to try to tear down barriers. >> the protest will not end. >> there is a large pro-morsi gathering a week ago when they slashed. leighing many dead and danger while the authorities stood by. they fired in crowd of protesters. several were injured. "they attacked us from all directions. they randomly fired from all directions." the critics called it discriminatory. and say this is rim in addition sent of form -- reminiscent of hosni mubarak. they say he was elected democratically and protecting what is built by the revolution. morsi's government had to postpone request for imf for much-needed $4.8 million loan. "we need to hang to the dispute" said the prime minister, "in order to bring stabilization to this countr country." egypt military is calling for a national unity meeting to calm things down. morsi's muslim brotherhood said it will attend. opposition hasn't decided whether
if mohammed morsi gets his way at the ballot box. tomorrow, the second half of egypt votes on a draft constitution that critics say begins the process of turning the arab world populist country in an islamic state. at the halfway point, those in favor of the move lead the vote by a double digit margin. saturday includes voters in mostly southern egyptian provinces, typically poorer and experts say likely to favor the islamist by wider margin. the latest round of violence began last month when morsi gave himself almost king like powers bridging thousands of people to the street in protest and forcing the army to ring the presidential residents with tanks. the speed at which morsi is pushing through constitution that limits the free speech and women's right, while being based largely on shiria or islamic law is increasing fears that the muslim brotherhood is ruling egypt by that old adage. "one man, one vote. one time." john? >> leland vittert in jerusalem. thanks. still ahead. solutions to flip the script when it comes to debt and deficit. first, the national rival association calls fo
been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the revolutions are going around the region. syria is teetering, georgia is burning, and the future is yet to be written. the question now is in all these countries will there be elections, will the islamists win? will it be one man, one vote or one-man, one-vote, one time. so with that we are going to debate the motion of democracy is the triumph in the middle east, it's up about box and is unavoidable and essential. we will have five minutes of opening remarks from each of our panelists today. we will start with ruel again to the good and go to brian and have q&a for myself as well as the audience and our panelists will be allowed to minutes at the end to restate their case and he essentially persuade you to believe what they believe. we will start now with ruel. ruel, you may begin. >> this is that such an angle. ruel, i'm confident you wi
's referendum vote on a divisive new constitution. it was drafted largely by allies of mohamed morsi. an egyptian spoke men said that they will aim at ending the political crisis. >>> and a global call for countries to lift their hiv travel restrictions. 45 nations seen on this map have laws that deport, detain, or deny entry to people who are hiv positive. now companies like coca-cola and gap and from the nba say those travel bans are discriminatory and bad for business. until recently, the u.s., too, had regular layings that barred foreign nationals from receiving a visa from entering the country. president obama lifted that ban in 2010. >>> and a chain of check stores is selling what they believe is the, yes, very last shipment of twinkies in the country. jewel said that hostess offered the entire shipment left in the georgia plant, including 20,000 boxes of twinkies and 5,000 boxes of ding dongs, zingers and you can buy them while supplies last but not for much longer. if you're thinking of the gift to give someone, just don't know what to get them, give them a twinkie. >> when w
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
by the egyptian president mohammed morsi. it is expected to take place at any time. we're told that during the day he met with the army chief as well as his ministers to try to come up with some way to stablize the country. he was in the presidential palace earlier in the day. this despite the fact that there was some very violent clashes in the last 24 hours just outside that palace. take a look at the tape and you can see what took place just a few hours ago. on one side supporters of th president morsi. on the other secular groups say they oppose the islamist agenda. during the clashes firebombs and rocks were thrown. there was also gunfire. as you mentioned at least seven dead and at least 600 injured. the republican guard placed tanks and armored vehicles outside the presidential palace this morning and the commander of the guard which is primarily tasked with protecting the presidential compound tried to assure egyptians in this conflict it is not going to take sides. in the last few hours the guard ordered rival protesters to leave the presidential palace. morsi supporters have withdrawn an
mohamed morsi, a scene of shooting earlier today. but the focus tonight, rick, is a few miles away from where we are right now, the presidential palace. anti--morsi protesters out there in big time. they've been trying to knock down a barrier made of rock and steel separating them and the palace, all the while supporters of morsi are gathering not too far away also in big numbers. there was a deadly clash between those two sides just one week ago. the fear is this could happen again. the difference, however, between now and then is that morsi in the interim has endowed the military here with stronger powers. they can intervene, maybe break up some violence. now, all the while this is all focused on that draft constitution which is planned for a vote, a referendum on saturday. the critics of morsi say that he's trying to rush it through. they say it's discriminatory towards segments of the population here, and they also say that his own style over the last couple weeks reminiscent of one other strong man we've seen here in egypt, mubarak. for his part morsi and his supporters say they we
president mohammed morsi's allegiances are as uncertain as his grip on power. under a foreign aid deal signed in 2010, when morsi's u.s. friendly predecessor hosni mubarak was in charge, the u.s. is giving the -- we're giving the plains to egypt -- the planes to egypt's air force. which already has more than 200 of the aircraft. the first four jets are to be delivered beginning january 22, a source at the naval air base in fort worth where the planes had been undergoing testing told foxnews.com. but the $213 million gift is raising questions on capitol hill. morsi is under fire for. the article gos on, buchanan, who recently called for ening foreign aid to egypt altogether said the muslim brother-backed morsi government has been sending increasingly troubled messages, or signals, to washington and giving it state of the art fighter jets is a dangerous idea. he's quoted as saying, american tax dollars must not be used to aid and abet any dictatorial regime that stands with terrorists. representative thornberry of texas, vice chairman of the armed services committee said eyipt is a wild
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)